Wage & Hour

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    Jazz Director Accuses Philly Pops, Execs Of RICO Conspiracy

    A former Philly Pops jazz director has sued the defunct orchestra group, its ex-CEO, a rival orchestra, the Kimmel Center and others in Pennsylvania federal court, claiming they conspired to monopolize the orchestral music market and lied about the organization's debt to force it to shut down while depriving him of pay.

  • May 24, 2024

    CVS Hit With PAGA Suit Alleging OT, Records Violations

    CVS Pharmacy Inc. regularly requires employees to work overtime due to understaffing and unreasonably high workloads without appropriately compensating them, and the company alters records by clocking employees out to make it seem it is complying with labor laws, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in California state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ex-Employee, Furnisher Renew Settlement Bid In FLSA Suit

    A corporate office furnisher and a former employee who alleged he was fired after complaining about unpaid overtime have once again asked a Georgia federal judge to approve a settlement between them, saying they cured all issues identified by the judge when he refused to approve the deal in April.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Again Upholds Engineers' OT Win

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Friday backed for the second time a lower court's ruling that two engineers receiving a weekly minimum salary as part of their compensation package were not overtime-exempt and sent the case back to the district court to determine damages awards.

  • May 24, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Should Pay Up In SEIU Arb. Case, Judge Says

    A cleaning company and its related entities should be required to compensate terminated workers with more than $22,000 stemming from an arbitration award, a New York federal magistrate judge recommended Friday, saying a Service Employees International Union affiliate showed the businesses were alter egos.

  • May 24, 2024

    4 Places That Are Leading The Gig Worker Pay Push

    A growing list of cities and states are setting mandatory wage floors for gig workers, who are typically classified as independent contractors and therefore not eligible for minimum wage protections. Here, Law360 explores places with minimum pay for gig workers.

  • May 24, 2024

    NY Forecast: School Pushes To Arbitrate Retaliation Case

    On Thursday, a federal judge will consider a Buffalo, New York, Catholic school's bid to compel arbitration of claims brought by a former president who says she was retaliated against after she uncovered financial and academic issues at the school.

  • May 24, 2024

    Applicants Lack Fed. Standing For Wash. Pay Range Lawsuit

    A Washington federal judge sent back to state court a lawsuit alleging an employer violated a new state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, finding that a job listing without pay information does not harm job applicants enough to justify a federal lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    Liberty University Fights Class Cert. Bid In Time Sheet Suit

    A supervisor of intramural sports at Liberty University can't prove that other workers are similar enough to support collective certification in a suit alleging the university messed with employees' time records to cap their hours at 40 per week to avoid paying overtime wages, the school told a federal judge.

  • May 24, 2024

    Medical Courier Service Settles Drivers' Overtime Suit

    A Georgia-based medical courier service accused of failing to pay its drivers their proper overtime wages has agreed to settle the case, according to an unopposed bid for settlement approval that calls the deal "approximately equal to plaintiffs' best possible day at trial."

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    PNC, Loan Officers Ink $12M Deal In Rest Break Suit

    PNC Bank has agreed to pay nearly $12 million to end a class action alleging the bank didn't pay mortgage loan officers for time spent on breaks and failed to issue accurate wage statements, according to a joint motion filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    $30M Deal Sealed In Cleaners' 15-Year-Old Wage Dispute

    A California federal judge on Thursday placed the final stamp of approval on a $30 million settlement resolving a 15-year-old class action accusing a janitorial company of misclassifying workers as independent contractors, saying the terms of the deal are favorable especially in light of continuing the long-running litigation.

  • May 23, 2024

    Novartis Settles Ex-Saleswoman's Gender Pay Bias Suit

    Pharmaceutical giant Novartis and a former sales representative have agreed to end a suit alleging she was paid over $20,000 less than a male colleague pitching the same product, according to filings in Colorado federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    FirstKey Sanctioned For Trying To Coerce Workers In OT Suit

    A Texas federal judge sanctioned FirstKey Homes LLC for issuing coercive communications to employees in an apparent effort to steer them from joining a proposed wage and hour class action, finding Wednesday the only purpose the company had was "attempting to undermine the collective action in this case."

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Panel Gives Restaurant Group's Arbitration Bid New Life

    The arbitration agreement a hospitality company gave to a former employee was not ambiguous, so a trial court must look at a wage and hour case again, a California state appeals court ruled, giving the company's arbitration bid another chance.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Appeals Court Brings Back Axed PAGA Case

    A California appeals court revived a worker's representative claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act, finding a lower court's order should be revised following a 2023 state Supreme Court ruling clarifying which PAGA claims can be sent to arbitration.

  • May 23, 2024

    Business Groups Fight OT Rule Raising Salary Limits

    A group of business associations urged a Texas federal court to block a 2024 U.S. Department of Labor rule raising the minimum salary on overtime exemption for executive, administrative or professional employees, saying the rule doesn't rectify the errors from a 2017 rule that the same court enjoined.

  • May 23, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Questions Role In Wage Suit After Ch. 11

    Jackson Lewis PC attorneys were unsure if they were able to keep representing more than a dozen Pennsylvania nursing homes as an unpaid-wage case approaches a critical deadline, telling a federal court during a conference Thursday that the Bankruptcy Code suspended their service to a group of defendants who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier in May.

  • May 23, 2024

    County Tells Full 4th Circ. Inmates' Wage Ruling Went Too Far

    A Fourth Circuit panel decision that determining pay for incarcerated people working at a Baltimore County recycling plant should focus on the purpose of their work unprecedentedly expands the reach of federal labor law, the county said, asking for the full court's intervention.

  • May 23, 2024

    Philly-Area Home Health Co.'s OT Settlement Gets First Nod

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an early nod to a deal resolving a proposed class of nurses' overtime suit against a Philadelphia nursing home that allegedly failed to pay its in-home care workers the proper rates for overtime in violation of both state and federal wage laws.

Expert Analysis

  • One Contract Fix Can Reduce Employer Lawsuit Exposure

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    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling that saved FedEx over $365 million highlights how a one-sentence limitation provision on an employment application or in an at-will employment agreement may be the easiest cost-savings measure for employers against legal claims, say Sara O'Keefe and William Wortel at BCLP.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • What To Expect From The DOL's Final Overtime Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's final overtime rule dramatically increases the salary threshold for white collar workers to be exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, so employers should prioritize identifying the potentially affected positions and strategically consider next steps, say Leslie Selig Byrd and Deryck Van Alstyne at Bracewell.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

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    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Refresher On Employee Qualifications For Summer Interns

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    Before companies welcome interns to their ranks this summer, they should consider the extent to which the interns may be entitled to the same legal protections as employees, including the right to be paid for their hours worked and to receive at least minimum wage and overtime, says Kate LaQuay at Munck Wilson.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.