Wage & Hour

  • June 12, 2024

    Conn. Eatery Owners Threatened To Kill Ex-Worker, DOL Says

    A Connecticut restaurant group and its leaders ordered workers to lie to federal investigators during a wage and hour probe and threatened to kill an ex-worker for helping the U.S. Department of Labor, the agency said in a complaint filed in federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    'Unconscionable' Arbitration Pacts Keep PAGA Suit In Court

    A cemetery and funeral services company can't compel arbitration of two former employees' Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit because the arbitration pacts it gave them are "unconscionable," a split a California appellate panel ruled, affirming a trial court's decision.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Wendy's Worker Drops Suit Over Breast-Pumping Space

    A former Wendy's employee who accused the company and multiple related entities of failing to provide proper private space for workers to pump breast milk despite federal labor laws requiring them to do so has permanently dropped her claims from Ohio federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owes $353K For H-2A Violations, DOL Says

    A Nebraska construction company operating in California must pay nearly $353,000 in back wages and fines for denying 43 workers their full wages and rights under the H-2A temporary worker program, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    Texas Firm Accused Of Misclassifying Paralegal As Contractor

    A Texas personal injury law firm misclassified a paralegal as an independent contractor and its director constantly changed the paralegal's time sheets, resulting in unpaid wages, she told a Texas federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Magistrate Endorses Axing OT Suit But Allowing 2nd Chance

    A federal magistrate judge advised tossing an unpaid overtime lawsuit against a California cold storage company that specializes in packing agricultural goods, but said the worker should have an opportunity to flesh out their claims.

  • June 12, 2024

    DOL Hits IHOP Franchises With FLSA Suit

    The owner of IHOP franchises in Illinois owes more than $568,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full tips and wages, the U.S. Department of Labor said in a complaint.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    9th Circ.'s AB 5 Ruling Leaves Less Hope For Striking Law

    A full Ninth Circuit ruling that California's Assembly Bill 5 doesn't violate certain businesses' equal protection rights is, for now, likely the end to yet another argument parties have used to challenge the worker classification law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Dem Bill Would Cancel 2018 High Court Ruling On Arbitration

    House and Senate Democrats reintroduced legislation Tuesday that would do away with mandatory workplace arbitration agreements, a move they said would counteract a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said requiring solo arbitration in worker disputes didn't violate federal labor law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Home Depot Again Notches Win In OT Suit

    A California federal court ruled that although a group of workers accusing Home Depot of unpaid overtime set forth enough new evidence to reconsider a win the home improvement chain snagged, the workers didn't sustain their arguments that the company purposely tried to dodge overtime laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Attys Must Justify Bid For Extra Fees From Tip Deal Leftovers

    The attorneys representing workers accusing restaurant chain Famous Dave's of violating tip regulations will need to justify why they are trying to get a portion of unclaimed funds in an almost $1 million deal, a Maryland federal judge ruled.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Truck Drivers Get $242K Atty Fee In Wage Suit Deal

    A North Carolina federal judge has awarded a class of truck drivers for a shredding company just under $242,000 in attorney fees on top of a $725,000 settlement to resolve claims the company deducted pay for meal breaks they did not take.

  • June 11, 2024

    Labcorp Workers' $2.4M Wage Deal Wins Court Approval

    A California federal judge placed the final stamp of approval on a $2.4 million deal ending class claims that Labcorp failed to pay overtime wages for the time carriers spent driving to and from locations and violated state meal and break laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Childcare Custodian's Weekly Wage Suit Can Continue

    A childcare center custodian can continue with his claim that the center operators failed to pay him weekly wages as state law requires for workers who perform manual labor, a New York federal judge ruled, but cut his claim that the center didn't provide proper wage notices.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs Strip Club And Dancers' $165K Wage Deal

    A South Florida strip club operator will pay $165,000 to dancers who claimed they were misclassified as independent contractors and denied minimum wages, under a settlement agreement approved by a federal judge.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    NM Restaurants Pay $254K For Tip, Wage Violations

    Two restaurant franchise locations in New Mexico paid more than $254,000 in back wages, damages and fines for keeping a portion of workers' tips and denying them minimum and overtime wage rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • June 11, 2024

    Parts Of Tesla Wage Suit To Lead To Arbitration, Judge Rules

    Twelve current and former Tesla employees will need to bring claims that they worked through meal and rest breaks to an arbitrator, a California federal judge ruled, rejecting arguments that their signatures on arbitration pacts were forged.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Papa John's Driver's Race Harassment, Pay Suit Proceeds

    A Black former pizza delivery driver for a Papa John's franchise can pursue his claims that he faced a hostile work environment and was underreimbursed for mileage, an Alabama federal judge ruled, but the judge limited the methods the worker can use to prove his allegations.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    Uber Black Drivers Aren't Like Plumbers, Philly Jury Told

    Uber Black drivers on Monday tried for a second time to convince a Pennsylvania federal jury that the ride-sharing company owes them the same perks as employees, saying they're nothing like plumbers, the quintessential independent contractors.

  • June 10, 2024

    Migrant Cleaners Rebuff Colo. Hotel's Bid To Ditch Wage Suit

    The migrant contractor staff that cleaned a Colorado luxury hotel slammed the hotel's efforts to escape claims of underpaying its workers, telling a Colorado federal court Monday that the hotel set the terms of their employment.

  • June 10, 2024

    Full 9th Circ. Rules AB5 And Its Exemptions Are Lawful

    The California Legislature had a plausible reason for creating certain carveouts from a state law governing whether workers are employees or independent contractors, the full Ninth Circuit ruled Monday, departing from a panel's decision that Assembly Bill 5 disfavors companies such as Uber.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • How To Start Applying DOL's Independent Contractor Test

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor finalized a worker classification rule that helpfully includes multiple factors that employers can leverage to systematically evaluate the economic realities of working relationships, says Elizabeth Arnold and Samantha Stelman at Berkeley Research Group.

  • PAGA Turns 20: An Employer Road Map For Managing Claims

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    As California’s Private Attorneys General Act turns 20, the arbitrability of individual and representative claims remains relatively unsettled — but employers can potentially avoid litigation involving both types of claims by following guidance from the California Supreme Court’s Adolph v. Uber ruling, say attorneys at Mintz.