Food & Beverage

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    Logan Paul's Energy Drink Co. Sues Boxer For Defamation

    Prime Hydration, led by YouTube celebrity Logan Paul, has accused boxer Ryan Garcia of defamation in Texas federal court over his ongoing campaign to paint the drink in a negative light, including saying it contains harmful chemicals like cyanide that will "hurt you big time."

  • May 24, 2024

    Shuttered Paper Mill Flouted $12M Incentive Deal, NC AG Says

    The state of North Carolina is suing food and beverage packaging company Pactiv Evergreen to recoup $12 million in economic incentives the company allegedly accepted to keep a local mill up and running after it abruptly shuttered the facility last year.

  • May 24, 2024

    Judge Finds Cannabis Tracking Suit Targeted Wrong Agency

    A Colorado maker of cannabis edibles lost its bid to block state marijuana regulators from requiring that cannabis companies buy inventory trackers made by Florida-based Metrc, a nationwide vendor of such tags, when a state judge ruled Tuesday that the edibles-maker sued the wrong agency.

  • May 24, 2024

    Food Supplier Says Exec Raided Files, Jumped to Competitor

    A senior sales executive at a Massachusetts food distributor spent his final days with the company slipping in after hours and on weekends to print out and photocopy customer records and other trade secrets, before jumping to a direct competitor, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    Software-Aided Price Fixing Under Antitrust Assault

    Claims that companies in the same industry are using software middlemen to fix prices are percolating in federal courts around the country, with cases targeting major operators in residential real estate, hospitality and health insurance, among other areas.

  • May 24, 2024

    NYSE Companies Could Face Heat If Business Focus Changes

    A New York Stock Exchange proposal seeking additional authority to delist companies that enact wholesale business changes after going public could subject certain companies to more scrutiny, attorneys say, though such drastic actions are expected to be rare.

  • May 24, 2024

    Stew Leonard's Sued Over Dancer's Peanut Allergy Death

    The family of a U.K.-born dancer is suing the Stew Leonard's grocery store chain, alleging its failure to update labels of cookies that contained peanuts led to her death at age 25 from an allergic reaction.

  • May 24, 2024

    Feds Prep Dumping Duties On Indonesian, Ecuadorian Shrimp

    The U.S. Department of Commerce preliminarily found that Ecuadorian and Indonesian shrimp were being sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices, unveiling a slate of tariffs to address the dumping.

  • May 23, 2024

    Entrepreneur Ordered To Pay $15M For Unlicensed Pot Stores

    A New York state court hit a cannabis seller with a $15 million judgment Thursday after he was found to be selling marijuana without a license at seven locations inside the state, according to an announcement by the state's attorney general.

  • May 23, 2024

    EU Fines Mondelez €338M For Curbing Snack Competition

    The European Commission on Thursday fined U.S.-headquartered multinational snack company Mondelez International Inc. €337.5 million ($365.74 million) for entering into anticompetitive trade agreements with resellers and abusing its position as a chocolate giant to maintain high prices.

  • May 23, 2024

    Green Groups Sue Colo. Over Factory Farm Pollution Regs

    Two environmental groups on Thursday urged a Colorado state court to review the Centennial state's decision to issue a permit allowing large animal feeding facilities to operate without monitoring requirements, saying waterways and the public are being exposed to dangerous toxins produced by thousands of animals.

  • May 23, 2024

    Md. Restaurant's Bid For H-2B Cooks Doomed By Payroll Data

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge has refused to rescue a Baltimore Caribbean restaurant's efforts to hire cooks through the H-2B seasonal worker visa program, saying payroll records undermined claims that the restaurant experienced surging demand during the warmer months.

  • May 23, 2024

    House Members Approve Closing Delta-8 Hemp 'Loophole'

    A U.S. House of Representatives committee on Thursday approved a major change to the statutory definition of hemp and hemp products — which would effectively rewrite national hemp policy if it became law — in the next version of the federal Farm Bill.

  • May 23, 2024

    'New' Facts Don't Permit Do-Over, Kraft-Heinz Tells Chancery

    An institutional shareholder of The Kraft-Heinz Co. is not entitled to a "do-over" on an insider trading lawsuit that Delaware's Court of Chancery dismissed in 2021 because the supposed "new evidence" it offers isn't actually new and wouldn't have made any difference in the case, the company said Thursday.

  • May 23, 2024

    Resignation Letter Bylaws Targeted In Five Del. Class Actions

    General Motors Co. is among the latest targets of new bylaw-focused litigation from Abbott Cooper PLLC and Block & Leviton LLP, one of five companies in a series of lawsuits in Delaware's Chancery Court that seek to invalidate an "irrevocable resignation requirement" in company bylaws.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Winery Minority Owner Can't Try To Cancel TM

    The Federal Circuit has affirmed a Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decision that a family trust that is a minority owner of Paul Hobbs Winery, which owns the trademark registration on the name of winemaker Paul Hobbs, does not have the right to seek cancellation of registrations on certain trademarks.

  • May 23, 2024

    4th Circ. Rules No Coverage For Mars' COVID Losses

    Candymaker Mars Inc. can't get coverage from Factory Mutual Insurance Co. for its COVID-19-related losses, the Fourth Circuit ruled Thursday, further rejecting Mars' bid to certify a question to the Virginia Supreme Court.

  • May 23, 2024

    DOL Says 11th Circ. 'Alone' In ERISA Internal Remedy Stance

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Eleventh Circuit to reinstate a lawsuit from former seafood company workers who claimed their employee stock ownership plan was overcharged in a $92 million deal, saying they didn't jump the gun by suing instead of pursuing claims internally.

  • May 23, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Fast-Track Challenge To DOL's OT Rule

    The Fifth Circuit won't speed up a Dairy Queen franchisee's challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's decision to increase the salary threshold for a Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption, turning down the entity and its owner's bid to expedite the appeal.

  • May 23, 2024

    Linklaters Leads Tate & Lyle To Exit US JV For $350M

    Food producer Tate & Lyle said Thursday that it has agreed to sell its remaining stake in its ingredients business in the Americas to U.S. investment firm KPS Capital Partners for $350 million in a deal guided by Linklaters LLP.

  • May 22, 2024

    Conn. Judge Doubts Restaurant's Insurance Beef Is Stale

    Connecticut's chief intermediate appellate court judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.'s position that a restaurant is barred from suing over the denial of coverage for a worker's hand injury, suggesting that previous litigation over the worker's compensation policy has no bearing on the current suit. 

  • May 22, 2024

    5th Circ. Reopens Black Diner's Bias Suit Against Texas Chili's

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday revived a Black diner's suit against Chili's alleging she was denied a table that was later offered to her white fiancé, finding direct evidence of discrimination, including the hostess's apology for discriminating against her, and the lack of service once her group was seated.

  • May 22, 2024

    Paul Hastings Leads Kayne Anderson Unit's $100M IPO

    An affiliate of Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors has announced it raised roughly $100 million in an initial public offering, with Paul Hastings LLP advising the company and Ropes & Gray LLP representing the underwriters, joining a handful of similar specialty investment vehicles that have gone public in 2024.

Expert Analysis

  • How Real Estate Cos. Can Protect Their IP In The Metaverse

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    The rise of virtual and augmented reality creates new intellectual property challenges and opportunities for real estate owners, but certain steps, including conducting a diligence investigation to develop an understanding of current obligations, can help companies mitigate IP issues in the metaverse, says George Pavlik at Levenfeld Pearlstein.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Patent Lessons From 4 Federal Circuit Reversals In April

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    Four Federal Circuit decisions in April that reversed or vacated underlying rulings provide a number of takeaways, including that obviousness analysis requires a flexible approach, that an invalidity issue of an expired patent can be moot, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • High-Hazard Retailers: Are You Ready For OSHA Inspections?

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    In light of a bill introduced this month in Congress to protect warehouse workers, relevant employers — including certain retailers — should remain aware of an ongoing Occupational Safety and Health Administration initiative that has increased the likelihood of inspection over the next couple of years, say Julie Vanneman and Samantha Cook at Dentons Cohen.

  • Questions Remain After Mass. Adverse Possession Case

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    A recent Massachusetts Land Court decision, concerning an adverse possession claim on a family company-owned property, leaves open questions about potential applicability to closely held corporations and other ownership types going forward, says Brad Hickey at DarrowEverett.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Saying What Needs To Be Said

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that delve into the meaning and effect of contractual releases, and demonstrate the importance of ensuring that releases, as written, do what the parties intend.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Del. Dispatch: Chancery's Evolving Approach To Caremark

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    Though Caremark claims are historically the least likely corporate claims to lead to liability, such cases have been met in recent years with increased judicial receptivity — but the Delaware Court of Chancery still expressly discourages the reflexive filing of Caremark claims following corporate mishaps, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • Leveraging Insurance Amid Microplastics Concerns

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    A pending microplastics lawsuit — New York v. PepsiCo Inc. — may be a harbinger of what is to come for companies whose products are exposed to the environment, so any company considering how to address microplastics liability should include a careful assessment of the potential for insurance coverage in its due diligence, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • TTAB Ruling Raises Foreign-Language Mark Questions

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board's recent decision to cancel the Veuve Olivier registration due to its similarity to Veuve Clicquot brings new focus to the treatment of foreign terms and the doctrine of foreign equivalents, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Best Practices To Accommodate Workplace Service Animals

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Since the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently pledged to enforce accommodations for people with intellectual, developmental and mental health-related disabilities, companies should use an interactive process to properly respond when employees ask about bringing service animals into the workplace, say Samuel Lillard and Jantzen Mace at Ogletree.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

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